Monthly Archives: February 2016

Focus12 : The Need to Store Right

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Have you ever walked into a market where vegetables and fruits are all mixed up just in ONE basket? Imagine ripe, yellow bananas, green beans, strong-smelling onions and mild flavoured avocados all tossed into one big basket. And wonder why breads are placed in specific baskets where grain is stored in jute bags?

2. That brings us to focus on containers or baskets seen everywhere in markets.

Fruit is best displayed or stored in wicker baskets. Neatly arranged fruit remains well aired and the changing colours and smell pleases the senses. Baskets are also used for keeping fresh-baked breads. The shape of the bread remaining intact with the specific size and shape of the basket. Food chemistry is another deciding factor on the choice of container. Onions give a strong odour, thus need an airy mesh container. Bananas ripen quickly emitting ethylene gas, storing them separately from other fruit is essential.

Country style markets often display fresh produce in bamboo or wicker baskets. Sometimes straw baskets, totes for vegetable shopping, picnic baskets, bread baskets are sold in market stalls. They come in handy to the unprepared customer or an artistic shopper who delights in collecting.

Baskets for sale in Berne market

Baskets for sale in market in Bern.

The French have a flair for perfection and art! The baguette sits on long wooden shelves and either sits tall in a tote bag or lies sideways in a long basket. Certainly, one shoe does not fit all sizes!

Wicker baskets for storing various food

Wicker baskets for storing various food

In less fortunate countries, recycling and reusing is a way of life. The old basket turns handy for discarded fruit peels.

Wicker basket used for trash fruit peels

Wicker basket used for trash fruit peels

Jute sacks are popular for storing food grain. The natural fibre, allows the grain to breathe and cool. At Venkatesh Kirana (wholesale food grain) shop in Hyderabad market, pulses and rice are kept in large jute or plastic sacks.

Food grains store well in jute or plastic sacks

Food grains store well in jute or plastic sacks

In contrast, in Thailand, small quantities of rice sit pretty in cane baskets.

Rice grains stored in baskets

Rice grains stored in baskets

Cardboard boxes and crates make ideal containers for green vegetables and fresh flowers. Perishable produce is best stored away from direct sunlight, preferably under the shade of a canopy or covered under huge umbrellas.

Fresh vegetables stored in boxes under a canopy

Fresh vegetables stored in boxes under a canopy

At flower stalls, buckets of fresh water make for ideal containers. Baskets are lined with wet sponge to hold and nourish floral arrangements.

Fresh flower storage

Fresh flower storage

Strong smelling onions are best kept on open platforms in markets and are sold loose. Metallic or nylon mesh containers provide light and air for storing larger quantities of onions and help in the release of strong odour.

Airy metallic containers to store onions

Airy metallic containers to store onions

How are fruits and flowers stored in markets near your home? Your comments will add value and interest to my posts.

All content and images copyright Veena S. (2013 -2016) http://www.walktomarket.wordpress.com. Please see copyright disclaimer

 

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World Palate Recipes: Andhra Palli Pachadi( Peanut Chutney)

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   Andhra Palli Pachadi (Peanut Chutney)

Groundnuts or peanuts are extensively grown on the central Indian Deccan plateau. Regional produce thus, often finds its way into regional cuisine!

Deccan cuisines of Maharashtra, Gujrat and central Andhra often incorporate the crunchy, nutritious peanuts in a variety of ways. Boiled with salt they are served as street snack, lightly roasted in oil they add crunch to salads (koshimbir), and when ground to paste they blend into gravies – thus finding their ways into recipes. Peanuts add texture, colour and nutrition!

Are peanuts the world’s healthiest food? Cheaper than almonds? Maybe. Rich in proteins and minerals, comparatively cheaper than exotic almonds and hazelnuts. Often in the agricultural rural regions, peanuts are a perfect answer for the poor man, farmer or labourer toiling away.

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=101

Thanks to my domestic helper Satyavati, in Hyderabad. She taught me to make this simple, rustic and quick chutney…typical rural method.

Aren’t you lucky she shared her simple knowledge with us all?

Image result for quotes about sharing knowledge

Courtesy: Internet.

Ingredients

Peanut chutney ingredients

Peanut chutney ingredients

250 gms lightly roasted peanuts ( or buy a pack from supermarket)

2 small onions

1 inch ginger

2-3 sprigs coriander for garnish

water as required

salt as needed

2 red chillies ( or as desired)

Tempering:

1tsp mustard seeds, 1 tsp jeera (cumin seeds) 2-3 curry leaves, 2 tsps. cooking oil.

Method:

Place peanuts in heavy bottom wok /kadhai and lightly roast them, continuously stirring them for about 10 minutes. Place aside to cool, remove skin. Cool completely. (Else use pre roasted peanuts from jar or pack:)

Make the tempering – heat oil in pan, splutter the mustard and jeera seeds. quickly add red chilli and switch off gas. Add curry leaves. Cool.

In a grinder, place peanuts and make coarse powder, stirring in between to check consistency. Mix well, grind further to finer paste. Remove and place in container.

Grind the onion and ginger to paste, using water sparingly. Mix with peanut powder. Adjust salt, chilli and water to this mixture to make a runny consistency.

Add the tempering, mix well. Chutney is ready in a jiffy! Garnish with coriander leaves. Serve preferably along with dosa, uttappa or rice. Leftovers can find their way into sandwich or Roti.

Chutney and Uttappa

Chutney and Uttappa

Do you have another method for this chutney? Or if you wish to contact me for another peanut recipe, leave a message. Remember to share.

 

All content and images copyright Veena S. (2013 -2015) http://www.walktomarket.wordpress.com. Please see copyright disclaimer