Monthly Archives: July 2016

Details in Hand Embroidery and Crochet

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 Here is my entry for this week’s Daily Post Photo Challenge.

Dictionary meaning of Detail is: specific feature, attribute, characteristic or element of an item or fact.

Whether in Nature or man made items, to create details involves extra time, effort and craftmanship. I salute all artists, weavers and craftsmen today as they  work on creating finer details in their hand made items.

Parsi Kor  borders showcase exquisite embroidery. Highly priced or kept as rich heirloom pieces, these borders are done with a cross stitch. A  variety of coloured threads in silk or cotton are used. The borders are then attached to sarees or wedding gifts like table linen.

Parsi Saree with traditional Kor / Border

Parsi Saree with traditional Kor / Border

Traditional Kashmiri designs are another example of detailed work.  Men and women, both work as Karigars or weavers. Thread colours used here are white (safed) and turquoise (firozi). Common motifs used are: paisley, delicate chinar leaf, saffron, narcissus and lily flowers. Just as in Nature, twirling creepers and lines add delicate element.

Kashmiri embroidery

Kashmiri embroidery

In crochet and knitting the details of design and stitch add that extra element. The picot stitch can be used in the border or in the body pattern (as I am using here). Picot adds a bit of charm, especially when used in borders to create a pointed effect on the line.

Crochet: Picot stitch

Crochet: Picot stitch

 if you want to produce something above the normal, just work on the DETAILS !

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World Palate Recipes: Mumbai Style Vada Pav ( Burger)

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World Palate Recipes: Mumbai Style Vada Pav ( Burger)

Mumbai is a city which never lets anyone go hungry, a city that introduced the ‘iconic’ Vada Pav as its humble, satisfying street food. Maharastrian cuisine is zesty, spicy and masaledaar and the Vada Pav fits this concoction. Train travellers and Vasaiwallahs  popularly ate it as ‘ breakfast on the go.’  Today, with a hundred over kiosks and street stalls in Mumbai, the Batata vada and pav  are immensely popular among college students, office workers and at Shiv Sena political party meetings. Truly, this street food has captured the hearts of every Mumbaikar!

Vada Pav and Samosa at street kiosk, Mumbai

Vada Pav and Samosa at street kiosk, Mumbai

Served in a burger style with the vada (potato ball) sandwiched between sliced fluffy, white buns that are laced with dry garlic chutney.  A fried green chilli tucked in adds the fiery element of Maharashtrian cuisine.

Some of the most famous Vada pav kiosks are found near Sivaji Park, Dadar, CST Railway Terminal, Dadar’s Ruia college, MithiBai college, at  Chowpatty and Juhu beach. Let’s try an easy preparation in our  kitchen.

Batata Vada ingredients

Batata Vada ingredients

Ingredients

4-6 medium size potatoes

2-4 green chillies , finely chopped

fresh coriander and curry leaves (optional)

salt to taste

3-6 pods of garlic (optional)

1 inch ginger

green chillies with stem ( for frying)

2 onions chopped into quarters (optional)

4 white bread buns sliced in middle

Salted butter as needed

Oil for frying as needed

For Batter

1 1/2 cup gram /Besan flour

2-3 tbsps. rice flour (optional)

salt and chilli powder as per taste

water ( about 1 cup, as required)

Prepare a green chutney of your choice.

Method:

Boil and peel potatoes. Mash them lightly add salt to taste. Crush ginger, garlic, chillies in a mortar and add this paste to the potatoes. Throw in chopped coriander and curry leaves. Add a dash of turmeric (optional). Mix lightly and make balls. Set aside.

Batata /Potato balls and fried green chillies

Batata /Potato balls and fried green chillies

Fry the green chillies in hot oil, taking care they may splutter and pop out on you! Set aside.

Mix the batter with dry ingredients and add water slowly, to make a thick pouring consistency batter. Heat the oil, drop a tiny amount of batter to check if it rises /fluffs. Now dip /roll the potato balls in batter , coating well and drop them gently into the hot oil. 3-4 balls can be fried at a time. Don’t worry about tail ends, let them fry, and munch them later. Set aside balls on tissue to soak on extra oil ( if particular).

Lightly butter a thick Tava or flat pan. Roll the sliced pav and heat them on both sides till light brown.

Deep frying batata vada

Deep frying batata vada

Assemble the prepared items on a paper plate ( for a street food effect)-

1-2 fried chillies, chopped onions at one side, apply chutney to the inside of the sliced bun bread. Tuck in a vada. Tap the top half of bread into place and press lightly, so keep in place. Serve and enjoy with friends.

Mumbai street food: Vada Pav

Mumbai street food: Vada Pav

I take a lot of time and interest to make my blog. Please do not copy or paste my photos and material. Kindly contact me.

All content and images copyright Veena S. (2013 -2016) http://www.walktomarket.wordpress.com. Please see copyright disclaimer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Focus 12 : Markets as Fun, Outdoor Classroom

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Ask any young child if he or she wants an indoor or an outdoor classroom. ‘Outdoors!’ comes the instant reply. Even adults are known to be more attentive and engaging in an outdoor planned environment.

Can you recall one of your own experiences?

Many years ago, as a primary teacher, I took a Grade 3 class to the Serangoon market, Singapore. It was not just an outdoor field trip, but a planned Math lesson, with students bringing their worksheets.  Mathematics on the street, without calculators! Ever wondered how the uneducated street vendors quickly calculate prices even for 350 gms.? After completing interactions with vendors and doing additions, students then relaxed drawing scenes from their visit.

Many everyday problems require quick, approximate answers. Street-Fighting Mathematics teaches a crucial skill that the traditional science curriculum fails to develop.”
Eric Mazur, Balkanski Professor of Physics, Harvard University

Once as a tourist in Toulouse, France, I noticed a Kindergarten class at the local street market. Teachers and volunteer parents were at hand. And what were the students engaged in? With peels of laughter and some noses tuned up and squeaky, they were exploring textures and smells of various vegetables. On their worksheet columns they had to draw ‘Red’ and ‘Green’ vegetables. For a back to school activity, teachers bought fresh vegetables to make ‘Vegetable Soup ‘ or Soup au Pistou.

http://www.traditionalfrenchfood.com/french-soups.html

http://www.michaelppowers.com/prosperity/stonesoup.html

Kindergarten and Primary classes often have thematic play learning areas to simulate real-life activity. eg. market store, house corner, hospital etc. Thus after an outdoor field trip, children can transfer their learning in a simulated, creative classroom environment. Can you hear the young children play  ‘I want to be the grocer’ and ‘I will be Mummy, going to the market?’

Check out story books for children: One Bean, The Tree is a Plant, The Tiny Seed, The Cherry Tree.

http://the market mystery / read aloud /youtube

http://www.vegetables-for-kids.com/

Source: Internet. Kindergarten Dramatic Play area Market scene

When children go with their parents or elders on a market visit they can engage in multi sensory activities, reducing the boredom of walking around aimlessly or running between stalls. Parents can use this opportunity to teach their young children to touch /feel/pick up vegetables, check the price, talk to the vendors, learn about plant growth and care, likes and dislikes etc. Imagine an education centre with their very own farm and market! The process from growth to care and farming tips, to the plucking and pricing of the produce to be put up on the market stall. One HUGE learning game! Not only will the diet, awareness, physical and mental activity of the school improve , but it can be a great community involvement, besides hands-on learning.

Talking about Art students – Many times we see painters set up their canvas at a river side, near monuments or in green rice fields. Have you seen someone take centre stage at a market? Isn’t it a great package to unfold about culture, food, clothes, colours and people?

A Village Market scene. Source: Internet. Cameroon Art.com

What about cooking schools and fresh markets? If you’ve been to Italy, India, Sri Lanka, Thailand or any other country for a cooking class, a visit to the local market is certainly a MUST! My own experience goes back to Chiang Mai, Thailand. Along with 6 other guests and the hostess , we were taken by tuk-tuk to the local market to buy necessary vegetables and ingredients for the class. As we picked up fresh green leafy vegetables, chillies and rice – we were told their Thai names and uses in food.
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Sydney, Australia boasts of a very popular harbour side fish market and cooking class. You guessed right! Guests are taken to the fish market to learn about the varieties, before heading to the exquisite culinary experience.

 

 

Here’s a recap of how students (and adults) benefit from a learning outdoor at a market:

1. Children get outside and more active
2. Involves hands-on thematic activities
3. Creates opportunities to learn how to handle outdoor risks safely
4. Connects children to nature/farms/people/ community in ways making deeper connections
5. Teaches children about cause and effect through sensory activity
6. Provides a holistic development and love for eco systems.

Students play chess at a Farmer's market in Alamos.

Courtesy: Internet. losalamos/.dailypost.com Students play chess at a Farmer’s market in Alamos.

All you teacher and parent readers, I do value your comments! How did you like this post? What is your experience?

All content and images copyright Veena S. (2013 -2016) http://www.walktomarket.wordpress.com. Please see copyright disclaimer

 

Focus 12: Types of Markets

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Markets are a common place, where goods are purchased and sold. Generally located centrally, markets need to be easily accessible by people and transport, thus soon becoming a hub of activity.

Different markets are set up for different needs: livestock, fresh vegetable and fruits, flowers, textiles and clothing and sundry items. Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar, Asian Wet markets, New Zealand Art and Craft Sunday markets and Jaipur’s camel market are some examples. The type of market depends also upon the geography, logistics, the area of land cultivated and the people living nearby.

Some markets are covered, others work on open streets. Some even exist on waterways! Some are work at fixed place, some are ‘on the go’ operated using trucks or buses.

Indoor Covered Markets

In most big cities, the local municipal authorities designate an area for selling fresh produce, flowers, meat and poultry etc. The care and maintenance, infrastructure facilities for loading /unloading bays, toilet and food facilities are taken care of by the governing body. They are well covered and thus operational for longer hours and all weather conditions. The Asian Wet Markets, Mercato in Spain, Chatucheck market in Bangkok and the Grand Bazaar of Istanbul are popular.

Courtesy: Internet /La Bouqueria, Barcelona

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Covered fresh produce market in France

Street Markets

Street markets work an a fixed day and fixed street. They may be seasonal in the colder countries. Depending on the weather, street markets sell seasonal items like winter clothing, summer fruits, varieties of handmade breads, bakery products and baskets. Watch out for the general chaos, traffic, and debris on the street, especially in densely populated countries. http://www.discoverhongkong.com/eng/shop/where-to-shop/street-markets-and-shopping-streets

Floating Markets / Boat Markets

When a country or province is criss- crossed by canals and water ways, like in Venice, Bangkok, Srinagar or Kerala, much of the community and livelihood depends upon the use of these water ways. In Bangkok, the Ayyuthaya kings developed connecting the canals and improving life along the banks. On Dal lake, Srinagar, is India’s only floating market where the graceful boats are bedecked with the valleys flowers and fruits.

http://www.thaiwaysmagazine.com/thai_article/2505_floating_markets/floating_markets.html

http://www.phuket.com/phuket-magazine/kata-market.htm

Flea Markets

Flea markets are a great place to buy second-hand stuff, cheap stuff and old goods. Probably they began as tourists disposing their collections. However, flea markets around the world exist in every nook and corner of a city and have regular business on a particular day of the week.

Singapore Flea market, tucked in a lane near Serangoon a quiet place. Items are placed on the street itself on cardboards or cloth. One can browse old antiques, junk maps for reuse, collectibles like pipes and screws and pens, variety of paper, tea pots, old clothes and hats.

In recent times, there are more than one Flea market catering to particular items. Check out, before you head to one.

Take a look at ‘what’s hot’ in the Flea market in Goa, India.

http://www.mustseeindia.com/Goa-Flea-Market/attraction/12843

Livestock Markets

Don’t worry if you are not buying a camel, goat or sheep. Enjoy a trip to the nearest livestock market and wander among the large cages housing livestock. It can be a great place for children’s education too. Beware of the stench of animal fodder and poo!

My  visit to Al Ain ( U.A.E) camel market was a wonderful experience in Arabic culture and offered a closer look at wobbly legged camel babies. Beware! this is a dusty, noisy place with the distinct smell of camels and other livestock. This traditional souq, situated near Bawadi mall is very popular with the locals. Guides offer to take you around for a small fee of 10 -20 Dirhams, narrating camel stories.

Farmer’s Markets

Farmer’s markets or direct grower’s markets are found in most countries from America, Europe, India to Sri Lanka, Australia and more. The aim is to cut off the middle men, creating opportunity for the grower /farmer to directly sell his produce on a weekly or daily basis. In India, Rythu bazaar is one such model.

As a tourist in the small town Picton, New Zealand I visited a Farmer’s market. What delight! Fresh baked breads, assorted cheese cuts, hand-made candles and soap  were the novelty, other than the usual pumpkins, avocado and fresh seasonal berries.

Fresh vegetable stall at market

Fresh vegetable stall at market

Online Markets

In keeping up with technology, welcome to the online bazaars or markets. They cater to an ever-growing demand, mostly from a younger and educated population. Maybe cheaper, easier service just using the finger tips! Gone by are the days of picking up a basket, taking a brisk walk down the street, meeting people on the way and experiencing the freshness and activity typically seen in markets.

Flower Market

A visit to a flower market is always a refreshing experience. There’s always hectic buying and selling, pruning and caring for flower bunches, a wide display of colours in every hue and the faint fragrance hanging in the air. It’s not just fresh cuts like tulips, chrysanthemum, lilies one can buy – bouquets, garlands, garden plants, seasonal bulbs planted in trays and other decorative garden items beckon the visitor.

I’ve visited the Ghazipur flower market, Delhi, Dadar flower market in Mumbai, flower markets in Europe and Amsterdam. Truly, one can just sit with a paint brush and paper, trying…only trying to match Nature. For a narrative on Delhi Flower market see here.

https://www.iamsterdam.com/en/visiting/what-to-do/shopping/amsterdam-markets/flower-market

Pak Klong Talad is Bangkok’s biggest wholesale flower market. Its crowded, colourful, hectic and a rush on all the senses. People throng the market just after midnight, as truck loads arrive. Flower bunches need quick care and action for maintaining freshness till 3.00 to 4.00 am. Early morning is the most hectic time, when business is brisk.

What other kind of markets have you visited?  What was your experience?

All content and images copyright Veena S. (2013 -2016) http://www.walktomarket.wordpress.com. Please see copyright disclaimer